Erin Harris - @elmharris
Erin Harris - @elmharris
Erin Harris - @elmharris
Erin Harris - @elmharris
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Erin Harris - @elmharris
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Erin Harris - @elmharris
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Erin Harris - @elmharris

Erin Harris - @elmharris

Regular price
$270.00
Sale price
$270.00
Regular price
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This auction takes place on Instagram @metalsmithsforchange and starts August 12th at 10am PST and ends August 16th at 10am PST.

 

Item description:

Etched brass and sterling silver.  3" wide when open, 2.5" long when closed. Maurice's name is etched and soldered to the inside, with space for two photos. Maurice Stallard was killed by a white supremacist at a Kroger store in Jeffersontown, KY.  He went to Kroger that day with his 13 year old grandson to shop for supplies for a school project.   Maurice was 69 years old.  He was father.  A grandfather, a brother, an uncle, a veteran, an active member of his church.  A man who died senselessly and tragically. I spent a lot of time thinking of how to honor him, as I know next to nothing about him.  But I kept thinking of the kind of man who goes out with his grandson to buy school supplies.   I thought of his grandson, and how unbelievably terrifying it must have been for him.  The nightmares he must continue to have. I thought of my dad, born the same year as Maurice.  My niece and nephew adore him and I could absolutely imagine him going out with one of his grandkids to buy art supplies.  Or donuts.  Or ice cream.   I thought of my own grandfather, who used to gently tug at the white blonde hair on my arms and call them my little feathers.   The idea of a grandfather, taking his loving grandchildren "under wing" kept coming into my head. I thought of Maurice's involvement in his church. I thought of doves and feathers and angels wings, and I remembered a song sung at church when I was a little girl: "He will raise you up on eagles' wings, bear you on the breath of dawn.  Make you to shine like the sun, and hold you in the palm of His hand" And that felt right.    Wings that fold closed, his name held safely "under wing" and wings that open, to bear his spirit heavenward.